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France Property Market

France's coast meets four different seas: the North Sea and the English Channel in the north, the Atlantic Ocean in the west, and the Mediterranean in the south. France's highest point is Mont Blanc, which is over 4807 metres high. Its name means 'white mountain', because it's always covered in snow, even in summer. Part of Mont Blanc is in Italy and a tunnel runs right through the middle of the mountain between the two countries.

The remaining sides are mostly mountainous and are shared by seven European neighbours — Belgium and Luxembourg on the northeast; Germany, Switzerland, and Italy on the east; and Spain and tiny Andorra on the south.

Accordingly there are any different reasons to buy in France, a base in Europe, wine connoisseurs, retirees and investors generally etc.

There are no restrictions on foreign ownership in France. Most property is likely to be freehold. Apartments are likely to be held in two forms of freehold: co-ownership (which has meetings of co-owners, with votes taken and accounts kept), and volumes, adapted mostly for mixed-use developments. There are also leaseholds, for up to 99 years.

The country's real estate sector is bucking the trend of stagnant house prices in Europe. France has always enjoyed one of the most inflationary housing markets in the world, and people considering a property investment in the country have reason to be optimistic.

The FNAIM is a professional body in France that represents estate agents are forecasting property-owners in the major cities of France can expect price increases of between 3 and 8%.

The latest property market report from Notaires de France, analysing the French property market, confirms the major trends seen throughout the year – increases in the number of property sales and stable prices.

 

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